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The importance of translating children’s books to English

by translator Azita Rassi I vividly remember the day that my friend’s cute four-year-old daughter asked me what her favourite Iranian dish, ghormeh sabzi, was called in English. “They don’t have it over there, my dear, so they don’t have an English word for it,” said I, trying to explain to the shocked little girl. “But how do they live then?” she protested. It is not unusual for young children, or even young adults for…

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Encourage children to read Fairytales for a happy ever after

Buy Cinderella of the Nile  By Marie-Louise Patton Fairytales have deep cultural roots embedded in human history. From the beginning of time people have shared stories, passing them down from generation to generation. Whether it be orally, through illustrations or the written word, these fairytales have a significance in their telling: leave a mark, make us think and often teach a valuable life lesson. Every culture has their own versions of these classic fairytales and each…

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Books to save the mother earth

Buy Alive Again Buy The Orange House   By Meghan Sullivan Happy Earth Day! The day before it I went out for a walk and saw all the blossom on the trees. It reminded me that nature is so wonderful, and so vital for our lives. What would we do without the honey from the bees, or the wheat from the fields? But as cars whizzed by, I was also reminded that the way we live hurts nature.…

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Video: learn the lesson of The Boy Who Cried Wolf

It’s a timeless tale, but its message never gets old. Our retelling is given a fresh perspective – literally – by Mahni Tazhibi’s dizzying landscapes and enormous shadows. Below you can watch the introductory video for The Boy Who Cried Wolf! This classic fable playfully explores the temptation in us all to exaggerate – and the risks attached! The Boy Who Cried Wolf  is familiar as one of Aesop’s Fables, but its origins go much…

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