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Being up in the air and dancing!

Tiny Owl is in the middle of a busy summer of events at book festivals up and down the country. At the Greenwich Book Festival and the Hay International Festival, Alia Alzougbi’s storytelling sessions brought two of our titles to life: The Jackal Who Thought He Was A Peacock and The Parrot and the Merchant. In this special blog post written for Tiny Owl, she shares some of her thoughts about these events.   There lies a challenge…

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My kitties remind me of Will & Nill

By Lauren Sandford* Cats are funny little creatures. Some are energetic, playful and loveable, while others would much rather be left alone to sleep for hours on end, and only ever come around looking for food (the latter is DEFINITELY my fat cat, Toby). When I was growing up, I had two outdoor kitties who were also brothers; the little orange one was named Milo, and the fluffy black one we called Bubba. They loved…

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Bijan and Manije: an epic tale of love

Read a wonderful review of Bijan and Manije by Anne Harding:   Bijan and Manije is a re-telling of a story from Shahnameh (the Book of Kings), a collection of Persian myths and legends from many centuries ago, brought to life for children by Iranian poet and author Ali Seidabadi, and well translated by Azita Rassi. When the Armenians send word to King Khossow of Iran that their territory is over-run by terrifying boars, he offers a…

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A reassuring tale about the philosophical nature of language and being

Read a wonderful review of Alive Again by Book Trust:   A young boy asks his father what happens to the word ‘blossom’ when the blossom is blown from the trees. Does the word die, along with the blossom? What about rain, wheat or a journey? If these things disappear, do the words disappear too?   This unusual tale can be enjoyed on many levels. It subtly reassures children that although some things can no…

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Why wordless picture books?

By Samantha Brown* In 2012 the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) had a mission. A small Italian island called Lampedusa needed a library. But not any kind of library – this one was to be full of wordless books. The aim? To support refugee children arriving on the island and from the local community through the act of shared reading.   A collection of over 100 books was selected by IBBY National…

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