Menu Close

Reflecting on the reality!

 A response to the results of CLPE’s report on diversity in children’s books  By Simran Divatia, a second-generation Indian based in Reading  The first time I read a book that had a main character that looked like me, I was 11. It was many years too late, because I had spent most of my childhood feeling as though the magical adventures, schoolgirl mischief or secret mysteries I so loved to read about were things that…

Share

Bijan and Manije feels a lot like home

The importance of children seeing themselves represented in books  Buy Bijan and Manije  By Simran Divatia  When I was a child, it was incredibly rare to see an image in a book that reminded me of myself. All the princesses in my picture books looked a lot like each other, but not a lot like me. The ones I did see barely got a word in, and were never the focus of the story. In Bijan…

Share

We are about a peaceful diverse society

An illuminating interview with Tiny Owl’s publisher   Read a wonderful interview with Delaram Ghanimifard, co-founder of Tiny Owl, by fab Jo Bowers for the English Association’s English 4 – 11 magazine.   Tiny Owl is an independent book publisher of picture books that support a peaceful and diverse society. They are currently working on a project called Intercultural Bridge, pairing authors and illustrators from different countries. Jo Bowers recently interviewed them to find out…

Share

A magical sense of the richness of other people’s lives

Here’s a wonderful review of Tahmineh’s Beautiful Bird by Terry Potter from The Letterpress Project: One of the magical things that children’s picture books can do is to introduce younger readers to diverse cultures in a non-colonial, unpatronising way that gives them a sense of the richness of other people’s lives. Of course for that to happen however there need to be publishers prepared to go out and find the best writers and artists, translate…

Share

Appreciation of diversity: introducing a different lifestyle

By: Laura Hagerty*   In Tamineh’s Beautiful Bird, Parviz Kalantari uses artistic anthropology to show the colour and beauty of the Qashqai tribes-people in Iran. Through his vivid illustrations readers learn about the theme of nonconformity through the nomadic lifestyle of Tamineh’s tribe. Tamineh and her family are seen making their own bread, milking sheep, and weaving chantehs (carpet-like shoulder bags). They are also seen making their traditional journey south in autumn.   The Qashqai…

Share