Menu Close

Artistic illustrasions build an everlasting and suportive image to a child

  On Saturday, Delaram, Nikan, and I visited Ransom Gallery in Chelsea to see some works by Pier Toffoletti. In our view, his paintings are captivating and breath-taking. The feeling transferred from his works to the audience is one of merged reality, romanticism, and surrealism. With his works, the artist can momentarily take the audience from their surrounding reality to the world of imagination. The more engaged the mind becomes, the more artistic the work…

Share

Night Circus by Delssert and Kafka, Beckett, Ionesco, etc.

By: Ali Seidabadi, editor for Tiny Owl’s Persian series Although Iran is not a member of the Berne Convention and Iranian internal laws do not protect international rights for publishing foreign works in Persian, some Iranian publishers feel an ethical obligation to observe copyright and strive to publish the translation of selected foreign books only after buying their rights. A few days ago, in the bookshop opposite our home, I saw Night Circus, written and…

Share

Why Tiny Owl is different

Whilst following all the action via live tweets & the #kidsconf15 hashtag, we were thrilled to hear that print is still preferred by young readers. ‘75% of children still want a physical book experience’ Cally Poplak #kidsconf15 — Imogen Cooper (@EditorGoose) September 29, 2015 According to Imogen Cooper’s Tweet, 39.75% of children still want a physical book experience. That, and the fact 64% of young people prefer print to e book versions was music to…

Share

Hallowed ground: the mausoleum of Omar Khayyám and its gardens

Written by Ali Seidabadi,  editor in Tiny Owl’s Persian series. when I was 12, I went to a boarding school in Nishapur, north-easternIran, adjacent to the garden where the poet and scientist Omar Khayyám is buried. A part of the garden could be seen from our classroom window and the splashing sound of water, flowing down from a water tank amid the plants, was the background music of our lessons. Read the original article in…

Share

Pardekhani[1] and Picture Books

Ali Seidabadi, editor of  Tiny Owl’s Persian series   When I was a child, a kind of art was popular in Iran, which I can describe as a sort of collective illustration reading.  I have been captivated with this art for a while, thinking how greatly it resembles “reading” a picture book or an illustrated story, feeling amazed that nobody has yet mentioned this resemblance. This art-ritual is called pardekhani. There are illustrations on a…

Share